This is my Jar. It is quite awesome.

IMG00164-20110311-0845.jpg

This is my Pot. It is quite distructful.

dsajhsah.jpeg
This is my Ugly Mug. It is quite elf-like.
ffdddd.jpeg

This is my Square Mug. It is quite square.

dfdfdfdfdf.jpeg

This is my Coil Mug. It is quite pretty.

fdfdfdf.jpeg










Pollock Pollock was born in Cody, Wyoming in 1912, he was the youngest of five sons. His parents, named Stella May McClure and Leroy Pollock grew up in the city of Tingley, Iowa. His father had been born a McCoy, but took the surname of his neighbors because they adopted him after his parents died. Stella and LeRoy Pollock were Presbyterian. LeRoy Pollock was a farmer and later he was a land surveryor for the government. Pollock grew up in Arizona and Chico, California. He was expelled from one high school in 1928, then he enrolled at Los Angeles' Manual Arts High School, from what he was also expelled. During his early life he experienced Native American culture while he was on surverying trips with his father. In 1930, he moved to New York City, after his brother did. They both studied under Thomas Hart Benton at the Art Students League of New York. Benton's rural American subject matter shaped Pollock's work not as well. His rhythmic use of paint and his fierce independence were longer lasting influences. The from 1935 to 1943, Pollock worked for the WPA Federal Art Project. During his attempts to fight alcoholism, from 1938 until 1941 Pollock underwent Jungian psychotherapy with Dr. Joseph Henderson and then later on with Dr. Violet Staub de Laszlo in 1941 until 1942. Henderson made the decision to engage him through his art and had Pollock make drawings. The drawings led to the apperance of many Jungian concepts in his paintings. Recently it has been hypothesized that Pollock might have had a bipolar disorder. He wanted to change, but then he started a drinking problem.









Claude Monet


Claude Monet was born on November 14, 1840. He was the second son of
Claude Adolphe Monet and Louise Justine Aubree Monet. They were both
second-generation Parisains. In 1845 they all moves to France where Claude
would learn his talent and become famous.

When Claude started school it was apparent that he was just not good. He
wouldn't really do much, and he also did not show any interest in working
for his father at his grocery business. His only interest in the world was art,
but that didn't even start until he was around the age of 15.

On April 1, 1851, Monet entered Le Havre secondary school for art. The
local people knew him and his work of charcoal caricatures, which he sold
for 10-20 francs. Monet's first drawing lessons were from Jacques-Francois
Ochard. In 1856/1857 on the beaches of Normandy, Monet met an artist
namd Eugene Boudin. Eugene Boudin became Monet's mentor and taught
him to use oil paints. Boudin passed on his passion for outdoor painting
to Monet.

On January 1857, Monet's mother had died. When he was only 16, he left
his school and went to live with his widowed, childless aunt, Marie-Jeanne
Lecadre.

Finally in 1859, Monet had decided to pursue an artistic career, by doing
this he was going against his parents wishes. Monet decided to reside in
Paris, he met quit a few of popular French painters.

From 1860 to about 1862 Monet did military service in Algeria. During the
rest of the 1860s he experimented with his art, traveled, and made many
friendships with other artists. His travels related to his art. He was very
captivated with the natural sun light, atmosphere and color.

Only a few of Monet's paintings from 1860s have survived. Through the
1860s and the 1870s Moent suffered extreme financial hardship. He actually
destroyed his own paintings instead of them falling into the hands of his
creditors.

During the 1880s and 1890s Monet gained critical and financial success. In
1899, he began work on famous series of paintings of water lilies. Water
lilies were a big part of his house in Giverny, France.

Monet suffered from double cataracts and by the 1920s he was almost
blind. He had an operation done in 1923 it restored his eye sight enough
for him to finish a series of 12 large, 14 feet wide, water lily panels.
He died on December 5, 1926.